Social media addiction is not natural or normal but is it really a disease? | Roisin Kiberd

We should be focusing on living with Facebook et al, rather then abandoning, restricting or censoring it, says technology writer Roisin Kiberd Is social media addictive? The issue is complex, and probably generational. Its obvious that what social media does to us, especially those of us who are heavy users, is not natural, or normal. Its not normal to submit opinions for approval every day to an online crowd, nor is it normal to consume the opinions of strangers in bulk. Its not normal to live under the surveillance of software companies, which tailor their advertising with such eerie precision that it wake in the night to use social media, or to spend roughly depressed and alone. None of these …

Transportation Weekly: Waymo unleashes laser bear, Bird spreads its wings, Lyft tightens its belt

Welcome back to Transportation Weekly; I’m your host Kirsten Korosec, senior transportation reporter at TechCrunch . This is the fifth edition of our newsletter and we love the reader feedback. Keep it coming. Never heard of TechCrunch’s Transportation Weekly? Catch up here, here and here. As I’ve written before, consider this a soft launch. Follow me on Twitter @kirstenkorosec to ensure you see it each week. (An email subscription is coming.) This week, we explore the world of light detection and ranging sensors known as LiDAR, young drivers, trouble in Barcelona, autonomous trucks in California, and China among other things. This week, we’re going to put on our analysis hats as we explore the world of LiDAR, a sensor that measures distance …

Parents: don’t panic about Momo worry about YouTube Kids instead | Keza MacDonald

One is a viral hoax. The other is rife with distressing and disturbing content, says Keza MacDonald, the Guardians video games editor I first heard about Momo in my local parents WhatsApp group. Someone had screenshotted a Facebook post about a creepy puppet that supposedly appeared in unsuspecting childrens phone messages and spliced into YouTube videos, dispensing advice on self-harm and violent acts. I reacted with suspicion: this would hardly be the first time that something on Facebook was indeed a hoax, a viral shock-story driven by a frightening image and well-intentioned worry about childrens safety online. There have been videos on YouTube Kids with suicide advice spliced into otherwise innocuous cartoons as a malicious joke they just dont involve …